Germany Photo Gallery

Germany Photo Gallery

  • Berlin Brandenburg

    Modeled on the Acropolis in Athens and built for King Frederick William II in 1791, the monumental sandstone Brandenburg Gate in Berlin's Mitte district was the city's first Neoclassical structure. Measuring an impressive 26-meters in height - including the spectacular four-horse chariot perched atop - its six huge columns on each side of the structure form five impressive passages: four were used by regular traffic, while the center was reserved for the royal carriages. Huge Doric columns also decorate the two buildings at each side of the Gate, once used by toll-collectors and guards. Undoubtedly Berlin's most iconic structure, it was also once part of the infamous Berlin Wall and for a few decades was symbolic of the division of Berlin into East and West.

  • Cathedral
    The towering Cathedral of St. Peter and St. Mary, Kölner Dom, on the banks of the Rhine is Cologne's most impressive landmark. This masterpiece of High Gothic architecture, one of the largest cathedrals in Europe, was begun in 1248 and was the most ambitious building project of the Middle Ages. As imposing as its façade, its magnificent interior covers an area of 6,166 square meters and boasts 56 huge pillars. Above the high altar is the Reliquary of the Three Kings, a 12th-century work of art in gold designed by Nicholas of Verdun to house the relics of the Three Kings brought here from Milan. Other highlights include the panoramic views from the South Towers, the 12th- and 13th-century stained glass in the Three Kings Chapel, and the Treasury with its many precious objects.

  • Musem Island
    World-famous Museumsinsel, or Museum Island, lies between the River Spree and the Kupfergraben - a 400-meter-long canal off the river - and includes many of Berlin's oldest and most important museums. The heart of this pedestrian-friendly district is the Old Museum, constructed in 1830 as a place to exhibit the royal treasures. Soon after, the land behind the museum was set aside for art and the "knowledge of antiquity." Between 1843-55 the New Museum took shape, and the National Gallery was added in 1876, along with the Bode Museum, built in 1904 and home to collections of antiquities. Another highlight of a walking tour of these spectacular museums is the Pergamon with its recreated historic buildings from the Middle East. But be warned: there's so much to see among these amazing museums that you can't possibly cram it all into a single day.

  • Sanssouci Park
    Spectacular Sanssouci Park, laid out between 1744 and 1756, is considered the most celebrated example of Potsdam Rococo. Reflecting the personal influence of Frederick the Great, the park includes a lovely Baroque flower garden, more than 3,000 fruit trees, and numerous greenhouses. It's a pleasure strolling around this huge park, especially the straight-as-an-arrow, two-and-a-half-kilometer-long avenue, shielded on each side by trimmed hedges, perfect lawns, and gorgeous gardens. A number of park buildings are worth exploring, too, in particular thePicture Gallery with its many works of art; the exquisite Chinese House, an extremely elaborate garden pavilion; and the wonderful Roman Baths complex. The Palace itself, a single-story Rococo building with an elliptical dome in the center and a circular room at each end, is notable for its large oval Marble Hall and sumptuous apartments.

  • Neuschwanstein
    The old town of Füssen, between the Ammergau and Allgäu Alps, a popular alpine resort and winter sports center, is a good base from which to explore nearby Neuschwanstein Castle, one of Europe's most famous royal castles. From 1869-86, King Ludwig II of Bavaria built this many-towered and battlement-covered fantasy fortress - the inspiration for Walt Disney's famous theme park castles. A variety of tour options are offered, including guided tours of the sumptuous interior taking in the Throne Room, the Singers' Hall, and some of the country's most spectacular views.